Blue Henrietta

Abstractionistii folosesc forme si culori pentru a DISTORSIONA realitatea. Expresionistii folosesc emotia pentru a IMPRESIONA pe cei care privesc realitatea. Iubitorii artei populare folosesc texturi si modele pentru a DECORA realitatea. Contemporanii preiau o tema cunoscuta si MODERNIZEAZA viziunea cu ceva inedit. Artistii naivi folosesc inocenta copilariei pentru a LUMINA realitatea. TU CE FACI SA LE CUPRINZI PE TOATE?

a life on canvas

2s

Today I will present a review of Bruce Vinall’s work, an Australian painter with all his life on canvas.
Moved from Adelaide – South Australia- to Warrnambool- Victoria’s region-, he started to put his soul on canvas.
I will split his career in 5 periods, every 10 years, starting from ’70 and ending with the 5th period 2010-2015 (yet continues).
The first period was from ’70 to ’79.
Here you have a short gallery from his period.

1970

1970

1971

1971

1973

1973

What I see or feel?
I see some dark monsters or pies in the sky, who are chasing and fly after you – or … grab you!- .
It’s like the same seized eagle having a plague, still flies, comes by a nightmare or tells you: Welcome!
I mean the yellow and black canvas.
While the other side fulled colour – but still dominating by the cold colours – it’s full of clutter, agitation, restlessness. Those black lines,thicker, repetitive are like visual screamings. Something like ” see? I’m a black monster, I came from darkness and I will go in the dark with you’.
As a small sum to the first part: agitation, restlessness, dark colored spots but the feminine lines and the free flow bring a sweetness to the paintings. Even those who are dominated by black colour.
The blue tempers the brutality of black and yellow brings warmth of the painting.

In the second period it will be a little change! The reverse!

1982

1982

1984

1984

1986

1986

1988

1988

Here the kew word is heat – from the shades of yellow, orange and red and their derivatives – one that’s so strong for you that become toxic, such as a sulfide.
It’s illuminated during much affection, tenderness.
sometimes it’s easy to find and emotional logic beyond color . Therefore seems to know psychology. Yes, sometimes the sound have colors – that’s why I agree with Goethe ‘s theory -.
Returning to the colors: they transmit empathy, strong and deep emotions and a turns/ leading the human condition to lighting, finding the way to the light – or seeking and finding it after – . It’s the amazement of a happy soul. Redefine the beauty from life.

The third period is like this!

1999

1999

This shows the play between colours – message or equal lines – balanced static/ dynamic.
Again are explosions, warmth. The desert or lava are the same. The same toxicity and the wave of heat.
Are elephants or flying dragons and burned plants/peoples, lost in a desert of suppressed anger or dissatisfaction from monsters easily digestible by colours – black or dark spots per first to attract the center painting in the corners -.

2001 (1)

2001 (1)

2001 (2)

2001 (2)

2001 (3)

2001 (3)

2005

2005

2007 (1)

2007 (1)

2007 (2)

2007 (2)

In this period the Vip it’s the red.
Why?
In previous periods was red but with others from the same range of colours.Now it’s kinda lonely there – especially in 2001 -.
The palettes are quite singular : it is a green board, another blue, the other in red.
There is an evolutionary study plan, lightening or closing of shades so that exists undisturbed moods and thoughts.
Is an isolated world. Safe and alone.
There is a saying: Habit is the second nature.
There is this comfort that Bruce leaves behind brushes : his safe world on line, color, bending or turning, answer and question, flying games between burned and ether, between heaven and earth.
So THIS is his art : worldly . the world coming from the inclusion of reasons and also affect, anxiety masked BY safety and vice versa.

The last period is from 2010 and now – by now! – where you can see these!

2013 (1)

2013 (1)

2013 (2)

2013 (2)

From monomorphic forms to the colorful bodies and human figures.
In this period it takes place a revolution and change of vision.
Are geometric bodies, gender balanced lines – male and feminine- , you can see better figures – animals, humans that make sense – but monstrous figures are again controlling people – people look on the side – and another canvas are made with strict animal feminine silhouette with obvious sexual organs.

2014 (1)

2014 (1)

2014 (2)

2014 (2)

Sexuality acquires a new meaning to sail the past one : now appears maturity,the acceptance and independence to the animal part and those feelings beyond words.
Here/ now are specks of colours on a black background, like fireworks and reactions to comfort to all those years – conservatism – the game on the same ground color.
We can see a map of melting,the noxious effects – as I see in 2014 -.
So Bruce’s art it’s a full one: aggressive in the start but sentimental in the end, from “me” to ” us”, from shades and sulfuric air to breathable.

I have one painting in my mind. 😀

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posted by blue henrietta in cultural international,visual arts and dance and have Comments (16)

Simply: Cubism

http://www.martinries.com/article1995GB.htm
http://www.artic.edu/sites/default/files/libraries/pubs/1972/AIC1972Braque_comb.pdf
http://www.artesmagazine.com/2013/07/the-phillips-collection-washington-d-c-with-georges-braque-mid-career-still-life-paintings/
 
“Will you not allow that I have as much of the spirit of prophecy in me as the swan? For they, when they perceive that they must die, having sung all their life long, do then sing more lustily than ever, rejoicing in the thought that they are going to the god they serve.” – Socrates, Phaedo, 85.
“Leur vol est connaissance, l’espace est leur aliénation.” [Their flight is knowledge, space is their alienation.] – St. John Perse, Birds.
“Il n’est en art qu’une chose qui vaille: Celle que l’on ne peut expliquer.”
[In art there is only one thing that matters: what cannot be explained.]
Braque with Studio IV

Braque with Studio IV

Georges Braque was guided from a young age toward creative painting techniques. His father managed a decorative painting business and Braque’s interest in texture and tactility perhaps came from working with him as a decorator.
In 1899, at age seventeen, Braque moved from Argenteuil into Paris, accompanied by friends Othon Friesz and Raoul Dufy.
Braque’s earliest paintings were made in the Fauvist style. From 1902-1905, after giving up work as a decorator to pursue painting full-time he pursued Fauvist ideas and coordinated with Henri Matisse.
He contributed his Fauvist colorful paintings to his first exhibition at the Salon des Independants in 1906.
However, he was extremely affected by a visit to Pablo Picasso’s studio in 1907, to see Picasso’s breakthrough work – Les Demoiselles d’Avignon.
After this encounter, the two artists forged an intimate friendship and artistic camaraderie.
Braque at Fontainebleau

Braque at Fontainebleau

“We would get together every single day,” Braque said, “to discuss and assay the ideas that were forming, as well as to compare our respective works”.
The drastic change in Braque’s painting style can be directly attributed to Picasso. Once he understood Picasso’s goals, Braque aimed to strengthen “the constructive elements in his works while foregoing the expressive excesses of Fauvism”.
His landscape paintings in which scenes were distilled into basic shapes and colors inspired French art critic, Louis Vauxcelles, to coin the term Cubism by describing Braque’s work as “bizarreries cubiques.”
Braque and Picasso worked in synchronicity until Braque’s return from war in 1914. When Picasso began to paint figuratively, Braque felt his friend had betrayed their Cubist systems and rules, and continued on his own.
However, he continued to remain influenced by Picasso’s work, especially in regards to papier colles, a collage technique pioneered by both artists using only pasted paper.
george-braque
Viewers noted a more limited palette at Braque’s first post-war solo show in 1919. Yet he steadfastly adhered to Cubist rules about depicting objects from multi-faceted perspectives in geometrically patterned ways.
In this, he continued as a true Analytical Cubist longer than did Picasso, whose style, subject matter and palettes changed continuously.
Braque was most interested in showing how objects look when viewed over time in different temporal spaces and pictorial planes.
As a result of his dedication to depicting space in various ways, he naturally gravitated towards designing sets and costumes for theater and ballet performances, doing this throughout the 1920s.
In 1929, Braque took up landscape painting once again, using new, bright colors influenced by Picasso and Matisse.
Then in the 1930s, Braque began to portray Greek heroes and deities, though he claimed the subjects were stripped of their symbolism and ought to be viewed through a purely formal lens.
He called these works exercises in calligraphy, possibly because they were not strictly about figures but more about sheer line and shape.
In the latter half of the 1930s, Braque embarked on painting his Vanitas series, through which he existentially considered death and suffering.
Growing increasingly obsessed with the physicality of his paintings, he explored the ways in which brushstrokes and paint qualities could enhance his subject matter.
During the 1930s, as Braque experimented with a more colorful palette, he used black ground less frequently, but he returned to it in the 1940s.
The Washstand and Pewter Pot and Plate of Fruit, both from 1944, are examples of later works in which the artist-prepared black ground were applied to the bare canvases.
The grounds are characteristically matte, textured with sand, and visible throughout the composition. On both canvases, the ground layer paint was fluid when applied, as evidenced by drips on the tacking edges.
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His final series of eight canvases made from 1948-1955, each titled Atelier, or Studio, depicted imagery that represented the artist’s inner thoughts on each object rather than clues to the outside world.
In the summer of 1955 Braque visited the bird sanctuary in Camargue where the saline marshes in the delta of the Rhine provide rich plant food for exotic birds; this stimulated his imagination for birds or at least confirmed his fascination for them. Braque and the poet St. John Perse were brought together in 1961 by a mutual friend at the artist’s request, and he suggested they do something about birds.
The artist greatly admired Seamarks, Perse’s poem praising the sea as a majestic symbol enclosing the beginning and ending of life, and chose as epigram, “L’oiseau plus vaste sur son erre voit l’homme libre de son ombre, a la limite de son bien” [the bird, vast as its circle, sees man free of his shadow, at the limit of his weal].
At the very end of his life, Braque painted birds repeatedly, as the perfect symbol of his obsession with space and movement.
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In Atelier II the disorder of the studio is in flux with a plethora of real objects and invented shapes which metaphorically interpenetrate.
The bird is woven into an intricate enclosure of descending vertical lines, suggesting Mallarmé’s pli selon pli [phase over phase], as it traverses through light beams that descend from the skylight like the rays of the spectrum in Bernini’s Gloria or The Ecstasy of St. Theresa.
The bird acquires color and iridescence as it flies toward the cross-shaped easel, countering the movement of the arrow below; the bust (probably Hesperis,
which Braque sculpted in 1939/40) is also looking right, along with the large white arrow which prevents the bird’s movement from reigning over the composition.

 

the Studio II

the Studio II

 

The bird is in full flight in Atelier IV, its orbed wings suggest the artist’s palette as it approaches the easel.
The converging lines no longer suggest rays of light; perhaps the fractured lines represent the flight of the bird through curtains, or past window mullions and wainscotting, or even picture rails, mahl stick, and the display easel Braque often used to show his work.
But these linear areas play an important role in the spatial structure of the picture which depends on an elaborate play of verticals and diagonals helped by lines of direction.
The bird and easel dominate as the brushes in the vase point upward to the bird, while the brushes in the palette point horizontally toward the Mozarabic decoration.

at iv

the Studio IV

studio V

studio V

Braque believed that an artist experienced beauty “… in terms of volume, of line, of mass, of weight, and through that beauty [he] interpret[s] [his] subjective impression…”
He described “objects shattered into fragments… [as] a way of getting closest to the object…Fragmentation helped me to establish space and movement in space”.
Braque had adopted a monochromatic and neutral color palette in his earlier works, in the belief that such a palette would emphasize the subject matter.
These later paintings embody a form-in-color, as if muted by cool, gauzy Normandy coastal light; edges sharpened; objects occupying equal visual weight in the composition; with sensations heightened, as his complex structure of form, line and color invite the eye to move in an endless course through the composition, in search of a resting point.
One important element in many of Braque’s paintings—adding to their perceived depth and approachability—is his technique for applying a ground layer to the canvas before beginning to paint.
These were of two types: white and black. White ground, a highly textured material recalling stucco or fresco, was applied methodically.
“I prepare the ground of my canvases with the utmost care, for it is the ground that supports the entire picture, like the foundation of a house.”

About half of the paintings in the exhibition were prepared with either white or black ground. Black ground added a sense of depth and atmosphere, as their matte, unsaturated surfaces highlighted the flatness of the picture plane. Fine grains of variegated sand, both sparsely mixed with paint and scattered on top, further emphasized the materiality of the surface.

The artist rarely covered the entire undersurface of his painting, allowing portions of his work to become part of the finished composition.

The black ground is incorporated into The Napkin Ring (1929), serving as the base color for the blue and green veins of the marbled background and as the color of the table, otherwise defined only by an outline of yellow paint.

The lines are usually masculine but only when you are sure they are feminin, it’s the masculine part – we know that sometimes even them have feminin features, right? -.

Objects are from the same material . Even if they are fruits or simple objects, they look alike. They form the same structure.

Napkin ring (1929)

Napkin ring (1929)

Lemons and Napkin King (1928)

Lemons and Napkin King (1928)

posted by blue henrietta in ART and have Comments (3)